Service Oriented Architecture is your Ticket to Hell?


With reference to Service Oriented Architecture is your Ticket to Hell, it always amuses me how people insist on calling any idea which does not agree with their own, “bullshit” – always thinking in terms of absolutes, and believing “my ideas are great, yours are BS”. Remember, an idea is a dangerous thing when it is the only one you’ve got. The statement that Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) increases agility can be interpreted in two ways: as increasing the agility of your architecture, or as increasing your ability to adhere to the dogma of “agile development” (which has been bastardized as much as all dogma ultimately is).

(of course, I tend to think of SOA in the dogmatic view of Erl as somewhat bastardized as well, and I do not recognize his authority on the subject as absolute. I was modeling systems as collections of autonomous interacting objects/services years before the term was hijacked)

I will start by looking at the closing statement of the post, since I actually agree with it:

What I am saying is that, if SOA is scaled up without precaution, it can create systems so precarious that anyone asked to maintain them will feel like s/he’s won a ticket to programmer hell.

While I agree with this statement, I do not agree with specifically targeting SOA. This statement applies equally well to any architectural model, including any emergent architecture coming out of an agile development project.

Lets now look at the two specific concerns expressed with SOA.

It is not entirely clear to me that SOA requires excessive amounts of “up front” architecture. The only locked in architectural decision is the one to model your system as a system of interacting services. Even the choice of what kind of a service bus to use should not imply lock-in, since if you implement things properly, it is not particularly onerous to move services from one context to another. And the decision to model your system as a collection of loosely coupled services does increase the agility of your project, in some respects. Need an additional execution component? It is fairly easy to implement it without disrupting the rest of the system. Need to take one out, or change its implementation? Same thing.

Looking at the second concern, I would agree that is possible to create “strange loops” and other architectural oddities through unconstrained application of service oriented architectures. The same was said for a long time about inheritance dependencies in object oriented systems.  It remains important for the architect of the system itself to understand the implications of any services being used. This is an inherent complexity of large, complex, distributed systems.

(as an aside, this is a fundamental problem I have with agile methodologies – the idea that up front architecture is sacrilege – and I have seen little to no evidence the agile methodologies scale to large, complex projects).

As for the comparison between object oriented approaches and SOA, I do not see the two approaches as being mutually exclusive. What are services but large scale objects which respond to messages and provide a service/behaviour? Much of the same modeling concepts which apply to OOAD also apply at the larger scale (of course some do not – such as granularity of operations).

Ultimately, I find SOA to be a useful approach to modeling large, complex distributed systems (and yes, I have built a few). Is it perfect? Probably not. Are the “gothcha’s” in there if you apply it blindly, and without due thought? Absolutely – the same as any other approach I have seen. Is it the correct approach for every system and every project? Absolutely not. It is one approach. It pays to know more than one, and to use the correct one in the correct situation.

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About

I have been working in the world of technology for 25-odd years. I am an entrepreneur and consultant, focused on software solutions, social networking, and innovation processes. Currently, I am a Principal Consultant with T4G Limited, specializing in Portal Technologies (including SharePoint), software/systems development, service oriented architectures, and many other things which I will probably not remember until I need to use them. Prior to that, I was VP of Technology at Whitehill Technologies, Inc., where I spent almost 9 years helping to grow the company from a start-up to one of the most successful private software companies in Canada. Prior to that I worked on internet conferencing using early VoIP, and on large military communications projects. Before even that, I worked in satellite control, and remote sensing. Going way back to university, my focus was on theoretical physics and astrophysics. Currently my interests revolve around most aspects of software development, from technologies to management, and in the area of defining sustainable, repeatable processes for innovation within technology organizations. I also have a particular interest in Tablet PC technologies – I have been using one for several years, and I love it. On the personal side, I still have a strong interest in all aspects of science, especially physical sciences, as well as philosophy and comparative religion. In addition, I am into music, playing guitar (badly, I am sorry to say), and reading almost anything I can lay my hands on. I am also a member of the IEEE/IEEE Computer Society, and of the Association for Computing Machinery.

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One comment on “Service Oriented Architecture is your Ticket to Hell?
  1. Fred, it all depends on the budget allocation organizations can make for SOA, so yeah it could be hell if things dont work well

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Please keep in mind that any opinions, points-of-view, comments, or other content which I post to this site are mine and mine alone. They in no way reflect the views of my employer, my country, my dog, my cat, or anyone else you can think of. To paraphrase Monty Python, "That is the theory that I have and which is mine, and what it is, too."

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